Cultured Meat,
A new way to harvest an old product 

Dear Friend, 

If you’re like me, constantly looking out for new investment opportunities based on innovation and new technology, then you should already have heard about cultured meat. I am not talking about any plant-based substitute or a vegan product. I am talking about a real, juicy steak sizzling on the grill on sunny Sunday afternoons!

— Lars Tvede, Co-Founder of Supertrends

We recently found strong signals that my steaks will soon be grown in a lab instead of being sourced from Heidi, the beautiful swiss cow that stood on the meadow behind my house until just yesterday. So, we decided to closely monitor this rapid growing Supertrend 

Due to concerns over the environmental effects of intensive animal husbandry, such as overgrazing, deforestation, and greenhouse gas emissions, as well as general health risks associated with excessive meat consumption, analogues to meat from industrialized farming have been in higher demand in recent years, especially in more affluent societies. “Veggie-burgers” made from plant-based meat substitutes, such as the Beast Burger (produced by Beyond Meat) or the Impossible Burger (Impossible Foods), which imitate the texture and flavor of meat, are increasingly popular and are now being marketed through partnerships with major food corporations and fast-food chains.

Interestingly, when we move to synthetization, the production becomes largely digitised, programmable, intelligent, accurate and more compact. It is easy to see why cultured food grown in bioreactors can be more compact than meat from plants and, in particular, animals. In fact, we are looking at reducing land use by some 99%.


Download now our whitepaper to get a better understanding of how cultured meat will disrupt the agriculture sector


Supertrends in Cultured Meat. This publication reflects our approach of Future-as-a-Service. It is a dynamic overview of information on the current state and future trajectory of the cultured meat industry. Subscribers to Supertrends in Cultured Meat will receive periodical updates to ensure that the data and market assessments included here reflect the latest consensus among researchers and Supertrends experts. Subscribers will also have the chance to get access to related media as well as conferences with experts and networking opportunities with key players in the industry.


Custom grown foods

However, we should also bear in mind that when you grow microorganisms or cells in controlled environments, you can re-code them genetically using CRISPR, etc. Indeed, by producing the foods from the molecular level and up, we will be able to create foods and materials that are far better and / or healthier and over time also more varied than today.In principle, with such a Food-as-Software model, you will actually be able to create leather from the extinct mammoths or steaks from protected animal species – in virtually endless quantities. Tiger steak? No problem!

However, one can also easily create products that do not cause allergies, or infant formula, which are actually made from real breast milk cells. Or softice that is actually … healthy. In fact, there will be endless experiments with so-called “form factor” variants, such as the ability of foods to foam, raise, crunch, melt, change color, smell, taste or whatever you like.

There will also be lots of “fortification” with e.g. proteins, fiber and vitamins. In 2017, the most successful new food product in the United States was Halo Top, which is just healthier ice cream with lots of protein and fiber as well as quite a bit of fat.

Might our descendants also find it slightly distasteful that we bred chicken that grew so fast that after around five weeks – just in time for their slaughter – their legs couldn’t carry them anymore? Will they perhaps have heard stories about how our sometimes very unsafe relationship to domesticated animals may have triggered pandemics or antibiotic resistance? Or, 100 years from now, will they consider it odd that so many nature reserves were once allocated as grazing land for cattle, sheep, and other animals?

More meat, more problems

All of these developments have contributed to shifting consumer behavior. There is now a much greater acceptance than a few decades ago of the idea that the traditional meat industry is unsustainable. Moreover, these substitutes are no longer seen as niche products to be marketed to a small group of ethically conscious consumers interested in environmental protection and climate change mitigation, but as full-fledged tasty alternatives to meat that are part of the consumer mainstream.

Today, in developed countries, the carnivorous portion of our diet is almost entirely based on the mass-scale raising and slaughtering of livestock.

Globally, meat consumption is highest in North America and the European Union. Threshold countries and newly emerging markets rely to a greater degree on vegetables for their supply of protein. In parts of Central Africa, up to half of the protein consumed may at times be derived from entomophagy, or eating insects. Global meat production was 323 Mt in 2017, about 10 percent of which was traded globally.

These figures are increasing, both in absolute and in relative terms. A 2018 report by the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization predicted an increase in per-capita meat consumption growth of 2.8 kg retail weight equivalent (r.w.e.) in developed countries compared to the base period (average 2015-2017), while in developing countries, which account for most of the world’s population growth, half of that increase would be achieved. Overall, the FAO in 2016 predicted that rising incomes and population growth would fuel a 16 percent increase in consumption by 2025 compared to 2013-15, with most of that increase expected to take place in developing countries and centered on lower-cost poultry meat.

A field of opportunity

The global increase in demand also brings negative effects such as excessive land and resource use, increase in greenhouse gasses and other unsustainable practices that warrant a fundamental change in agricultural production systems. Cultured meat is a great alternative to the current practices and it helps ease the environmental load that industrial scale farming would require in order to keep on feeding the world.

Our subscription-based service starts with a dynamic report that offers deep insight into the most important aspects of lab-grown meat. It continues with a fast-paced stream of updates, facts, forecasts, and sentiments around the potential transformation of this very big business, so decision-makers will better understand what happens today, tomorrow, and in the future. We call it “Future as a Service”.

Do you want to know more? You can get started with the free report “Cultured Meat & Agriculture”.

Cultured Meat,
a solution before the cows come home

As Lars Tvede mentioned, the need for sustainable practices of meat production is increasing as mainstream interest in environmental conservation and ethical farming practices is more widespread. Innovative agricultural products such as Cultured Meat will have a wide customer appeal as they reflect a forward shift in technology, but also an important effort in conservation. It is also important to note that the implementation of cellular agriculture does not mean that traditional meat production will end all together. Meat-with-a-story will mean that practices will be more focused on delivering a premium commodity available for people who will be willing to spend more money on a high-quality artisanal product, analogous to preferring a Rolex timepiece over an Apple Watch.

The key to navigating this uncertain future and technological evolution will be precise and objective information on the advantages of implementing such technologies, the risks and challenges to traditional means of production and a comprehensive insight on who has taken the leap of faith to implement these changes. It is no lie that global food security relies in large part on the agricultural industry, therefore acceptance and implementation by this sector will be an important factor in the success of this innovative agrotechnology.

At Supertrends we have prepared a Dynamic Report that outlines the most important aspects about Cultured Meat. We cover the technology, consumers, key market players as well as challenges and benefits of this disruptive innovation in detail so that you can have a concise and objective insight that will help you make important future decisions and answer pressing questions such as What is Cultured Meat? How is it made? What will happen with the current agricultural practices? And most importantly, how does it affect my future?

Has this piqued your interest? Our report outlines the impact that Cultured Meat will make in the Agricultural sector and the key players who have chosen to embrace the future. Don’t waste any time and subscribe to our Dynamic Report on Cultured Meat to access this data and other information to make sure you are prepared for the future.


Yes, I want to get a better understanding how cultured meat affects the agriculture sector!


Supertrends in Cultured Meat. This publication reflects our approach of Future-as-a-Service. It is a dynamic overview of information on the current state and future trajectory of the cultured meat industry. Subscribers to Supertrends in Cultured Meat will receive periodical updates to ensure that the data and market assessments included here reflect the latest consensus among researchers and Supertrends experts. Subscribers will also have the chance to get access to related media as well as conferences with experts and networking opportunities with key players in the industry.


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