A tailor-made cocktail to nurture lab-grown meat

Spread this article to the world:
The lab-grown meat industry is rapidly expanding: Since the presentation of the first cultured beef burger in 2013, dozens of start-ups have been racing to be the first to sell lab-grown beef, chicken, pork, shrimp, or fish. For investors, meat cultivated from animal cells (also known as in-vitro meat or cultured meat) has become a very promising and innovative business field. At Supertrends, we are publishing a series of reports on this new, cutting-edge technology and the people who are working to make lab-grown meat a reality.  

Future Fields: Scaling the initial idea

When Matthew Anderson-Baron and Lejjy Gafour at Canadian start-up Future Fields started on their journey as entrepreneurs, they were thinking to produce and market cultured chicken meat as an end product for the domestic market in Canada. “I think it would be nice to have a Canadian company do this in Canada and provide it to a domestic market,” says Lejjy.  

However, when they developed a cheaper alternative to the costly Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS) growth medium, they saw opportunities for a bigger and more global role in the lab-grown meat industry.  Future Fields is now working on providing customized services and technical support for other companies that want to produce cultured meat. Depending on the type of stem cells used and customers’ requirements, Future Fields designs a tailor-made “cocktail” from their own growth medium and other components to meet the individual needs of each customer. “There is no magic silver bullet” for all types of meat, as Lejjy points out.  

lab-grown meat labor tools

Hurdles in the lab-grown meat industry

There are still big hurdles facing the clean meat industry. As the “tech guy”, Matt is really excited when discussing the technical future of cultured meat. While newly discovered alternatives in growth media are bringing costs down, building a cell scaffold remains one of the biggest obstacles in producing high-quality cuts like steaks. “More discovery needs to be done to create a viable, economical, and better product that can provide a similar consumer experience to traditional meat,” he adds. Matt thinks it will be at least another two years before a minimum viable version of a scaffold is available.

And where do Matt and Lejjy think the technology of cultured meat will take us in five, ten, 20, or even 40 years?Visit Supertrends App to find out what Matt and Lejjy predicted.

cultured meat, Future Fields, lab-grown meat


Jiqing Hansen

Having worked passionately for 15+ years in Medicine, I felt that I yearned to do something a little bit different, something that satisfies my curiosity and creativity, maybe something that helps to inform me and others what our world will look like in the future. That's when I took on the challenge of being the editor & expert relationship manager at Supertrends. I love the fact that I can still be in touch with my academic background when I am trying to understand and reach out to the experts in the most exciting fields. I also love the diverse and enthusiastic team at Supertrends. The best of all, I get to have a peek into the future, and I am at the position of helping many others to get the opportunity to look into the future.

Supertrends –
the tool for Future Predictions and Innovation Mapping

Find Us

Supertrends AG
Baarerstrasse 78
6300 Zug
Switzerland

Testdrive